I Am Falling into Reverie

Seeking the Meaning of Life

The following morning after the Christmas party at Leticia’s sister’s house, I am woken up at noon by Gerardo’s unimaginable loud fart, louder than human beings have ever produced yet in the history. It is literally so loud, I am almost jumping out off my skin, it is a sheer explosion. I am exasperated with his rude way of waking me up and shout, “Son of bitch! I thought someone threw dynamite at me. What time is it? I don’t need your fucking alarm clock in this morning!”

“Ha-ha-ha, sorry, man. I couldn’t control it. I must’ve forgotten to turn my alarm off yesterday. It’s noon sharp. My alarm clock is always exact, you know. You can sleep more if you want. Don’t worry; it’ll never explode again, I promise. Really sorry man, ha-ha-ha.”

The party had ended past 5:00 a.m. last night, so naturally I am still a wee bit sleepy and in a dreamy mood. I am lying down on the bed, and a single sunray is beaming in from the chink of curtain. The greeting of sunray makes me cheer up and makes me feel that today should be a glorious day. I am falling into reverie….

Gerardo’s family has their own way to enjoy Christmas. Each member of the family is obliged to buy a present for only one of family members. At this time, I was included as one of them. Three weeks ago, we decided who would buy a present for whom by picking up a paper on which was written a name from the box. I picked up the paper on which was written Javier’s name. Javier is Gerard’s oldest brother. My name was picked up by Jorgito. As a matter of fact, Gerardo and I went to Santa Fe to buy Christmas presents five days ago, and it took us over three hours to choose presents!

Yesterday at 8:00 p.m., Gerardo’s family and I gathered around the small Christmas tree that was surrounded with presents at his parents’ house. I gave Javier elegantly designed shirts and a perfume set. He was happy as a child when I gave him his presents and gave me amiable hugs three times in a row, since he could not repress his surprise and delightedness.

Jorgito gave me a mobile phone and two shirts with an expectant smile on his face. While I was opening the presents, his enthusiasm overwhelmed him, and he bellowed, “Shogo, tear them up! I told you, it’s very useful. Now you have a mobile phone. Let me call you. Oh my God, it’s very nice, man. You have fifty minutes free credit. Gerardo, here is Shogo’s mobile phone number – save it, save it! Shogo, do you like these shirts? Try them on right now because I want to see if they fit on you. Oh my God, they fit you perfectly!” 

In point of fact, it was a superb feeling to exchange presents sometimes. In Japan families are not as close as Mexicans. Japanese lost such feelings long time ago because of their hectic daily activities. I think that Japanese had better learn from Mexicans how to show their emotions unrestrictedly and how to enjoy such family bonds sometimes if they want to remain as human beings.